Category Archives: Music Units

Sell a Piece of Music!

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My students spent the last few weeks learning about the elements of music. We IMG_2851practiced identifying and describing things like tempo, dynamics, pitch, tonality, timbre, and texture. After lots of activities to reinforce their learning, they demonstrated their knowledge by completing a listening analysis of 4 pieces of music (Classic Rock, Jazz, Classical, and a song of their choice) and writing a review of one of the pieces.  To wrap it all up, they used their creativity to create an advertisement to
“sell” one of the pieces of music!

For the analysis, I gave students a choice of 5 songs in each category. To  give students some independence in their listening, I provided QR codes for each song. They were able to preview each piece and pick the one they wanted to analyze.  The review they wrote for one was meant to show their understanding of what they heard and their ability to apply appropriate vocabulary. These activities combined took 4-5 days to complete.

IMG_2859The advertisement  was fun because students got to share about the music and be as outrageous in their ad as they wanted to be.  We warmed up by watching a couple of “as seen on tv” product commercials and clips of infomercials.  We also looked at types of advertising techniques. You can find many websites that have student centered information on this – I used this one. Your ELA teachers might cover this as part of their standards so it may be an opportunity to collaborate! Once you start talking about these kids will come up with all kinds of current examples.

Students created a print ad (on poster or a google slide) or a script for a live commercial. The ad had to describe at least 3 elements of music in the song and use at least  advertising techniques. They had a great time with who could come up with the most outrageous claims!  The ads took about 3 days to complete (including the introduction of the advertising techniques.) You might need one more class period depending on how many students choose to present live commercials. If you have the technology the live commercials could be recorded and played back to the class, too.

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We displayed many of these in the hallway with the QR codes so everyone in the school could check out some new music!

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Remember that this is how I did things THIS TIME in my classroom. I’m

Here are links to all the materials used in these lessons:

Introduction to Project

QR Codes for Listening

Listening Analysis Grid

Music Review

Review Rubric

Advertisement Directions

Advertisement Rubric

 

 

 

 

Music & Health (a.k.a. 1 of my favorite units EVER)

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Anyone who listens to or makes music will tell you it often makes them feel better.  You may even know of situations where music helps improve medical conditions like dementia or speech impediments.  In recent years, we’ve moved beyond casual stories of the benefits of music to research that suggest the effects of music are physiological.  All of this creates the perfect setup for a Music & Health unit in our Music+STEM class.

Two of the goals for Music+STEM are:

  • Reveal to and engage students in the ways in which music is part of our lives and society
  • Engage students in the practice of the scientific process, critical thinking skills, and 21st century skills

We may take music in our daily lives for granted, but if students understand its direct effect they will be able to make intentional choices about its use – for themselves and those around them.  In addition, we move beyond answers that include phrases like “I think…” to researched-based responses such as, “The research shows…”

So…how did we do all this?

First, we did a very limited review of the research that shows the benefits of music.

We focused on five areas:

  1. Music reduces stress and anxiety
  2. Music decreases pain
  3. Music may improve our immune system
  4. Music helps us exercise
  5. Music may aid memory

We looked at the research in each of these areas, being sure to understand the research process, included control groups and variables. We also talked about replicating studies and comparing the results.

Next, we narrowed our focus to music and memory.We watched the documentary, “Alive Inside“.  This is an amazing look at the effort of one man to “awaken” nursing home dementia patients with music from their past.  My students were absorbed in listening to the stories of the patients and seeing their reaction to music. I debated whether or not to show “Alive Inside” to my students, thinking it might be too serious for them, but decided to for three reasons. First, it’s message matches our course goal of discovering how music is a part of our lives. Second, many students have family members with dementia or may someday and it’s important for them to have the knowledge to help their loved ones. And third, the documentary shows the power of social media in the hands of young people to make a difference in the world.  In the end, I’m glad I took two days to show the documentary.  The responses of my students show it made an impact.

Someday I hope to partner with a nursing home so that my students can create playlists for residents – just like in “Alive Inside”.  Since this was the first time we attempted this I decided to start closer to home.  My students set out to create a MEAM – Music Evoked Autobiographical Memory  – for a teacher.  Teachers volunteered the year they graduated from high school and students chose one teacher for whom to find music (some students were so into this they did more than one teacher!)

Students then found the top 5 songs of the year the teacher graduated from high school and the year they were in 6th, 7th, or 8th grade.  Students then chose one song from each of those years to share with the teacher and get their reaction and memories.  A few students did this in person with their teacher, playing the songs for them and writing down their reaction.  To make it easier to schedule, most students wrote a letter to their teacher (in Google Docs) and included links to the songs and questions to answer.  The teacher then listened and typed their response when they had the time available. I was afraid I was adding one more thing for already busy teachers to do, but  MANY said this was great fun and they looked forward to doing it every semester!  The students also had a great time listening to popular music that their teachers listened to and reading their responses.

 

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Finally, we needed a way for students to put everything together and showcase their learning.  I initially considered filming news broadcasts. This is often a challenge with middle school students, however, because so many are self-conscious about how they look on camera. As an alternative, we recorded podcasts – an audio version of a news story.  This exposed students to a form of media many were not familiar with and eased the anxiety when it came time to record.

 

Students had to include specific items in their podcast:

  1. At least 3 benefits of music to mental or physical health
  2. At least 1 piece of research to support one of the benefits
  3. A “real life” example of one of the benefits

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In groups of two to four, students spent about two days writing and practicing their scripts for the podcasts. We then recorded them using the Podcast feature on Garageband. This was very easy to do and even allowed for editing when students were struck with the giggles or lost their place in the script.

The podcasts really showed what the students learned and the range of kids we have in middle school – from very serious, down-to-business to goofy, adolescent jokes and funny voices …. all while summarizing what they learned about Music & Health.

We put the best ones on our class youTube channel – here are a couple samples…

 

 


 

In the end, this is one of my favorite non-performing units I’ve ever done with middle school kids. My students were engaged and gaining knowledge that will truly help them throughout their lives, the teachers who helped us had fun and deepened their relationships with kids, and students created a final product that went public and informed others. Win – Win – Win!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Improvising & Composing in Music+STEM

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As I mentioned in my last post, teaching kids to compose and improvise FullSizeRendercan be two of the hardest standards to address.  In it, I explained how my classes composed the blues by laying down the 12 bar blues chord progression and adding a melody based on the blues scale. When the kids finished this, they moved on to creating a background track they could improvise over.

When we start learning to play the blues on ukuleles I use a background track to beef up our sound and fill in the holes we’re not ready to play yet.  (You can read about how I introduce the blues on ukuleles in this post – just scroll down to Day 3.)  Because of this the kids have an idea of what a background track is and what it’s used for.

We again used Noteflight to create the background track – starting with the 12 bar blues chord progression and adding a drum part. Students were encouraged to create a rhythmically interesting chord progression and drum line.  They loved working on this because DRUMS!

There are several percussion instruments that can be added to a Noteflight score.  I had my students stick to “Unpitched percussion/Percussion 1 Line”.  The variation you see in the percussion “pitch” indicates low to high drum sounds and cymbals.

Here are a couple of examples of student work:

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The final piece of the students’ “Blues Portfolio” was a performance to improvise with the background track they composed.  When I was a young trumpet student I was terrified to improvise.  I’m sure it was because my teacher just said something like, “Ok, your turn, improvise!”  I had no idea what to do, because as we know, while improvising means you make it up as you go, you still need some rules and structure to follow.

The approach I’ve arrived at over the years is to provide a beginning structure with the fewest decisions possible.  That mean improvising a rhythm on one note.  When kids are comfortable with this, we move on and add another note.  In the key of C, this usually means we start on C and add E flat when they are ready.  As students progress they can add the rest of the notes in the Blues scale.  We used ukuleles to improvise but you could also you keyboards or even Orff instruments.  The Orff instruments are great because you can provide only the notes you want students to play.

The blues scale on the ukulele follows a simple pattern.  I learned how to do this from “Ukulele Mike” on youTube.

Mike teaches you how to improvise in the key of D.  To use the key of C you just shift everything down 2 frets.  So instead of playing frets 5-3 on the A string, you play 3-1 on the A string, then 3-1 on E string, and 3-0 on the C string.  I use this picture to help students remember the pattern.

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Finally, students performed their improvisation for me as their background track played.  Some students even performed for the class.

Improvising is a great way to individualize instruction for students.  As I said above, students can add notes as they are ready.  Some will stick to one or two pitches but many will challenge themselves to use all the notes of the blues scale.

I’ve learned that students need LOTS of modeling to learn to improvise.  They also need time to experiment and figure out what they can do – often without an audience.  This was the first time my students improvised.  It’s definitely something that we will spend more time on to develop their skills.


 

By the way, I was able to take a few of my students to demonstrate their learning for our district’s senior citizen luncheon.  They played the 12 bar blues and improvised!

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